Another Legal Victory for Bloggers


Image representing TechnoBuffalo as depicted i...

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Judge rules bloggers can qualify for shield law protections
Illinois judge dismisses case challenging bloggers’ right to protect anonymous tipsters

The Illinois-based firm JohnsByrne sued TechnoBuffalo when it refused to reveal the identity of the anonymous tipster who gave TechnoBuffalo the specs of Motorola’s Droid Bionic. JohnsByrne wanted the tipsters identity in order to pursue damages to compensate for its damaged relationship with Motorola. TechnoBuffalo won the case.
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Last March, Massachusetts gave bloggers who cover trials the same privilages as a traditional news media. read more

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About DigitalPlato

Poch is a Bookrix author and a freelance writer. He is a frequent contributor to TED Conversations.
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4 Responses to Another Legal Victory for Bloggers

  1. pochp says:

    That’s how I understand it too Jonard. But I still want to add more precise interpretation if there are more to be found. Thanks

  2. onetenthblog says:

    “Illinois judge dismisses case challenging bloggers’ right to protect anonymous tipsters”

    Phew. Interesting as this case got nothing to do with annoy-nymous blog comments– but define for us the legal principle during an instance of tipping the blogger. Still, this is not a legal cushion for vilification, defamation, etc.

    • pochp says:

      Wow OTB. I still have to do research before I can answer you lol.
      I’m not really into law details. Thanks.

      • onetenthblog says:

        All good. It’s a safety net nevertheless. I mostly follow national security, but always interested when it comes to blogging (I’d love to think of myself as one), net freedom.

        “JohnsByrne wanted the tipsters identity in order to pursue damages to compensate for its damaged relationship with Motorola. TechnoBuffalo won the case.”

        My understanding: Bloggers are not liable when it comes to failed business ventures because of seemingly ‘credible’ tips. This is not a legal cushion for vilification, defamation, etc. though. We’ll see how this one goes.

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