New Year Celebrations Around the World


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Too Drunk to Drive? AAA Offers New Year’s Eve Help
‘If all other plans fall through tonight and Wednesday, AAA is providing a last resort for intoxicated persons to get home.

‘The Tow to Go program is a free service available to both AAA members and non-members who have run out of options to get a safe ride home.

“’The main idea is trying to get people to make plans to get home safely,” said Don Lindsey, director of Tennessee public affairs for AAA. “If those plans with a designated driver or a ride with a taxi fall through, we provide an option to get drivers and their vehicles home.”

‘AAA tow trucks will take the vehicle and up to two passengers to a safe location within a 10-mile radius. Appointments cannot be made to use the program, as it is designed to be a last resort…’

Moderate Boozing Boosts Your Immune System
New study gives you a reason to have that New Year’s drink
I can attest to this. After 10 months being alcohol-free, I drank a bit last night and slept just 2 hours. And yet I felt finer than before.
‘”A moderate amount of alcohol helped the body’s ability to respond to infections and vaccines, ultimately reducing the risk of death.” (Via WUSA)

‘The study published in the journal Vaccine and conducted by Oregon Health & Science University revealed moderate drinking can strengthen the immune system. (Via WRC-TV)

‘The study monitored three groups of monkeys over the course of 14 months. In the beginning of the study, all the animals had similar responses to a vaccine for smallpox. (Via WTVT)

‘Researchers gave all the monkeys food and water. But one group only drank water, while another drank alcohol in moderation and a third group had excess amounts of alcohol. (Via KABC)

‘The animals were vaccinated again seven months into the study, only to find the moderate-drinking monkeys responded the best to vaccination…’
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About DigitalPlato

Poch is a Bookrix author and a freelance writer. He is a frequent contributor to TED Conversations.
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