Why Some Cultural Groups are More Successful


English: Chinatown San Francisco gateway arch ...

English: Chinatown San Francisco gateway arch 2010 California (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

What Drives Success?
Superiority complex is the primary trait that propel success
‘Group success in America often tends to dissipate after two generations. Thus while Asian-American kids overall had SAT scores 143 points above average in 2012 — including a 63-point edge over whites — a 2005 study of over 20,000 adolescents found that third-generation Asian-American students performed no better academically than white students.

‘The fact that groups rise and fall this way punctures the whole idea of “model minorities” or that groups succeed because of innate, biological differences. Rather, there are cultural forces at work.

‘It turns out that for all their diversity, the strikingly successful groups in America today share three traits that, together, propel success. The first is a superiority complex — a deep-seated belief in their exceptionality. The second appears to be the opposite — insecurity, a feeling that you or what you’ve done is not good enough. The third is impulse control…’
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How the 85 richest see the 3.5 billion poorest
‘…These are a tiny class of people that have appointed themselves to fix the problems of the world – in their own ways.

‘The same wealth disparity that has made the world’s 85 richest worth more than half of the entire global population has given them big enough heads to think they can call the shots.

‘And who will stop them? Who will even point out the harm, rather than just assume they are saints and thank their unilateral actions?…’
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Bank Clients  are Being Forced to Provide Evidence For Why They Need Cash!
‘What if private debt reached such obscene levels that the loans taken on by lenders could never be repaid? What if a country like China, which holds trillions of dollars in cash reserves and has modern central banking regulations, did face such a problem?

‘It turns out, that’s exactly what is happening right now, as Chinese banks struggle to cope with nearly $23 trillion worth of potentially bad loans. Yes, that’s Trillion, with a “T.” The Chinese, it appears, have mimicked the exact set of circumstances that led to the 2008 crisis in America. Remember all of those empty cities and malls in China – they housed no people or shopping venues, yet cost billions of dollars to develop? It looks like all those bridges to nowhere are catching up with the Chinese. And the panic has begun, as evidenced by capital controls and restrictive withdrawal policies now being implemented by one of the largest banks in the world all across China…’
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Do teens need to remodel their brain to enter adulthood?
Is the desire to shape one’s identity the cause of rebellion?
Remodeling the Brain
‘Instead of thinking of adolescence as a bunch of “hormones going nuts,” Siegel says you need to think of the brain as a plant. In order to grow in a healthy way, a plant is pruned. Pruning the garden of the brain is a destructive process, but it is a healthy process. Will you continue to use a foreign language or play a musical instrument or will you give it up? You can choose to strengthen these skills. On the other hand, if you give up soccer, those circuits will wither away. So use it or lose it.

‘When certain skills are practice, myelination occurs, which helps neurons communicate more efficiently. To illustrate this, Siegel points out that in executing on a particular skill, an Olympic athlete’s neurons coordinate 3,000 times more effectively than yours…’
bigthink

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About DigitalPlato

Poch is a Bookrix author and a freelance writer. He is a frequent contributor to TED Conversations.
This entry was posted in conspiracies, culture, economy, finance, personal development, Society and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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