Can Mathematics Make Us Emotional?


Saarbrücken, HTW, Mathematics Workshop

Saarbrücken, HTW, Mathematics Workshop (Photo credit: flgr)

I believe that there is Math in Music but I find hard to understand that it elicits reaction similar to great art since Math is cold logic while Music is basically emotional

‘Mathematicians were shown “ugly” and “beautiful” equations while in a brain scanner at University College London.

‘The same emotional brain centres used to appreciate art were being activated by “beautiful” maths.

‘The researchers suggest there may be a neurobiological basis to beauty.

‘The likes of Euler’s identity or the Pythagorean identity are rarely mentioned in the same breath as the best of Mozart, Shakespeare and Van Gogh.

‘The study in the journal Frontiers in Human Neuroscience gave 15 mathematicians 60 formula to rate…’
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7 Habits of Incredibly Happy People
I agree with the first: Be Busy, But Not Rushed. ‘Hyper’, uppity people harm themselves because they are always rushing. The first casualty is their hearts—heart ailments from irregular rhythm to high-blood pressure
‘In our day-to-day lives it is easy to miss the forest for the trees and look over some of the smaller, simpler things that can disproportionally affect our happiness levels. Luckily, we can go off more than just our intuition; there are lots of studies that aim for finding the right behavior that leads to a happier life. Below, we take a look at some of the more actionable advice…’

What are the Only Things Worth Worrying About?
Big Thinkers on the Only Things Worth Worrying About
‘In What Should We Be Worried About? (public library), intellectual jockey and Edge founder John Brockman tackles this issue with his annual question — which has previously answered such conundrums as the single most elegant theory of how the world works (2012) and the best way to make ourselves smarter (2011) — and asks some of our era’s greatest thinkers in science, psychology, technology, philosophy, and more to each contribute one valid “worry” about our shared future. Rather than alarmist anxiety-slinging, however, the ethos of the project is quite the opposite — to put in perspective the things we worry about but shouldn’t, whether by our own volition or thanks to ample media manipulation, and contrast them with issues of actual concern, at which we ought to aim our collective attention and efforts in order to ensure humanity’s progress and survival.’
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About DigitalPlato

Poch is a Bookrix author and a freelance writer. He is a frequent contributor to TED Conversations.
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