Americans Nervous of Futuristic Science, Tech


Science fiction museum
‘Americans are generally excited about the new technology they expect to see in their lifetimes. But when confronted with some advances that already appear possible — from skies filled with drones to meat made in a lab — they get nervous.

‘Nearly two out of three Americans think it would make things worse if U.S. airspace is opened up to personal drones. A similar number dislike the idea of robots being used to care for the sick and elderly, and of parents being able to alter the DNA of their unborn children.

‘Those are the findings in a report released Thursday by the Pew Research Center, which sought to gauge public opinion about our rapidly changing world of science and tech…’
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Is Science Fiction the Wrong Model for Imagining the Future?
Robinson Meyer thinks so
‘A lot of people might read that line and think: Wow, cool, Google is trying to make the future!

‘But “science fiction” provides but a tiny porthole onto the vast strangeness of the future. When we imagine a “science fiction”-like future, I think we tend to picture completed worlds, flying cars, the shiny, floating towers of midcentury dreams.

‘We tend, in other words, to imagine future technological systems as readymade, holistic products that people will choose to adopt, rather than as the assembled work of countless different actors, which they’ve always really been. The futurist Scott Smith calls these ‘flat-pack futures,’ and they infect “science fictional” thinking.

‘Science fiction, too, can underestimate the importance and role of social change…’
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Who Really Birthed the Scientific Method?
If you answered Isaac Newton, Galileo, or Aristotle, you’re wrong
‘In 1011, Ibn al-Haytham was placed under house arrest by a powerful caliph in Cairo. Though unwelcome, the seclusion was just what he needed to explore the nature of light. Over the next decade, Ibn al-Haytham proved that light only travels in straight lines, explained how mirrors work, and argued that light rays can bend when moving through different mediums, like water, for example.

‘Little is known about Ibn al-Haytham’s life, but historians believe he was born around the year 965, during a period marked as the Golden Age of Arabic science. His father was a civil servant, so the young Ibn al-Haytham received a strong education, which assuredly seeded his passion for science. He was also a devout Muslim, believing that an endless quest for truth about the natural world brought him closer to God. Sometime around the dawn of the 11th Century, he moved to Cairo in Egypt. It was here that he would complete his most influential work…’
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About DigitalPlato

Poch is a Bookrix author and a freelance writer. He is a frequent contributor to TED Conversations.
This entry was posted in history, science and technology, Society, TECHNOLOGY and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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