Proof that Evidence Backfires


blog.handcraftImagine if the illustrations below could be applied to actual crimes
‘…As if things couldn’t get any more depressing, Norbert Schwarz the coauthor of the “facts and myths” paper suggests that when a respected institution such as the CDC weighs in and debunks a claim, this can actually end up lending credence to the claim in people’s minds. Schwarz cites as an example an internet rumor about flesh-eating bananas that was so prolific it was debunked by the CDC website. When this happened, the flesh-eating banana scare grew and began actually being attributed to the CDC!

‘In an another study a similar backfire effect was found in Conservative voters who believe that Iraq possessed weapons of mass destruction. After receiving a correction that Iraq did not have weapons of mass destruction they became more likely to believe that Iraq had weapons of mass destruction than controls…’
bigthink

Interview with a Time Traveller
See if this would convince you that time travel is possible
‘Rather, from his grasp of classical philosophy and science, he has developed a convincing methodology for transcending time, not via a device or machine, but through the agency of human consciousness. It is not some futuristic technology, but present-day technique, Von Braschler demonstrates, that allows us to cross the time barrier.

‘A former newspaper and magazine editor, Von Braschler hosted his own weekly radio program, “Healing with Your Pet: Our Psychic, Spiritual Connection.” But it is his present effort that readers may find the most immediately engaging of all his singular achievements.

‘I began by asking him an obvious question…’

How Artists’ Brain are Different
‘Lead author of the study, Rebecca Chamberlain from KU Leuven, Belgium, told BBC News that she was interested in finding out how artists saw the world differently.

“The people who are better at drawing really seem to have more developed structures in regions of the brain that control for fine motor performance and what we call procedural memory,” she explained.

“It falls into line with evidence that focus of expertise really does change the brain. The brain is incredibly flexible in response to training and there are huge individual differences that we are only beginning to tap into.”

‘One of the study’s other authors, Chris McManus from University College London, said it was difficult to know what aspect of artistic talent is innate and how much is learnt:…’
dangerousminds

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About DigitalPlato

Poch is a Bookrix author and a freelance writer. He is a frequent contributor to TED Conversations.
This entry was posted in MYSTERY, neuroscience, publishing, social psychology, writing and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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