Proof of Human Stupidity?


chron.com-622x350People would rather be electrically shocked than left alone with their thoughts
What’s your choice? When we need to think deeply and learn, we should be alone in a quiet place. But how long can you last not electro-shocking yourself when you don’t need to do that and boredom is making you sleepy? Isn’t the time span a gauge for intelligence?

‘“I’m really excited to see this paper,” says Matthew Killingsworth, a psychologist at the University of California (UC), San Francisco, who says his own work has turned up a similar result. “When people are spending time inside their heads, they’re markedly less happy.”

‘To see if a change of scenery would help, the team let participants do the studies in their own homes, but still found similar results. Overall, the subjects said they enjoyed activities like reading and listening to music about twice as much as just thinking.

‘The researchers then decided to take the experiment a step further. For 15 minutes, the team left participants alone in a lab room in which they could push a button and shock themselves if they wanted to. The results were startling: Even though all participants had previously stated that they would pay money to avoid being shocked with electricity, 67% of men and 25% of women chose to inflict it on themselves rather than just sit there quietly and think, the team reports online today in Science…’
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3 Things Everyone Should Know Before Growing Up
People don’t judge you as harshly as you think they do
‘With peak graduation season just behind us, we’ve all had the chance to hear and learn from commencement speeches — . They’re often full of useful advice for the future as seniors move on from high school and college. But what about the stuff you wish you’d been told long before graduation?

‘Here are just three of the many things I wish I’d known in high school, accumulated at various points along the way to becoming a professor of psychology…’
npr blogs

Can You Receive Feedback Correctly?
‘Sheila Heen, a Partner at Triad Consulting Group and the co-author of Thanks for the Feedback: The Science and Art of Receiving Feedback Well, provides insights into learning to give and receive feedback skillfully. In an exclusive 8-part workshop for Big Think Mentor, Heen teaches the strategies and goes into the psychology of the art of feedback and how it can improve our relationships and enrich our lives.

‘She explains the mistakes people often make when it comes to receiving feedback: “We’re primed to look for anything that’s wrong with the feedback: ‘It was delivered at the wrong time in a totally inappropriate way.  It was completely unskilled, can you believe it.’ And so we look for anything we can pick apart. And there are two problems with this. One is if we find five percent that’s wrong, we throw the whole thing out, when in fact 90 percent of it could be wrong, but that last ten percent you could actually be just what you need to learn and grow.”…’
bigthink

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About DigitalPlato

Poch is a Bookrix author and a freelance writer. He is a frequent contributor to TED Conversations.
This entry was posted in communication, news, personal development, social psychology, Society and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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