This Virus ‘Makes Humans More Stupid’


independent.co-stem-cellsIs this another virus deliberately created? Most probably not because no one can make us all stupid e.g., Rebellion against the Antichrist.
‘The algae virus, never before observed in healthy people, was found to affect cognitive functions including visual processing and spatial awareness.

‘Scientists at Johns Hopkins Medical School and the University of Nebraska stumbled upon the discovery when they were undertaking an unrelated study into throat microbes.

‘Surprisingly, the researchers found DNA in the throats of healthy individuals that matched the DNA of a virus known to infect green algae.

‘Dr Robert Yolken, a virologist who led the original study, said: “This is a striking example showing that the ‘innocuous’ microorganisms we carry can affect behaviour and cognition…’
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How to steal back illegal sites from the FBI
‘Last week, American and European law enforcement triumphantly took control of 27 Dark Net websites in the highly publicized Operation Onymous, a campaign against a wide variety of Tor hidden services and their operators, including so-called Silk Road 2.0 and its alleged boss, 26-year-old Blake Benthall.

‘Now, the new owners of one seized hidden website have taken their website back from police. The re-seized hidden service, Doxbin, is fully operational as of 1pm ET…’
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Can Anonymity on the Net be Ended?
‘…Leaving aside the deeply troubling inference of requiring licences to the use the Internet in the same manner as obtaining a driver’s licence, the police desire to stop online anonymity suggests that the OPP has not read the Supreme Court of Canada Spencer decision very carefully. If it had, it would know that not only does the court endorse a reasonable expectation of privacy in subscriber information, but it emphasizes the importance of online anonymity in doing so. Justice Cromwell, speaking for unanimous court:

‘The notion of privacy as anonymity is not novel. It appears in a wide array of contexts ranging from anonymous surveys to the protection of police informant identities. A person responding to a survey readily agrees to provide what may well be highly personal information. A police informant provides information about the commission of a crime. The information itself is not private – it is communicated precisely so that it will be communicated to others. But the information is communicated on the basis that it will not be identified with the person providing it…’
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About DigitalPlato

Poch is a Bookrix author and a freelance writer. He is a frequent contributor to TED Conversations.
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